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remained close and his four children decided to donate his brain to the nih to try to understand why the man they loved and knew as an outgoing leader on and off the field changed so drastically in his final few years and ultimately ended it all, detached and alone. >> a lot of things towards the end of his life, patterns that we saw and things that worried us. his decision making and his ambition decreased. >> he would sometimes lose his temper. he would get irritable over very small things. kind of go off the grid for a couple weeks. >> reporter: all symptoms, experts say, of cte. >> impulsivity, aggressiveness, depression, sometimes suicidal. >> reporter: a once deeply respected and highly devoted family man, seau's behavior became confusing for his children. >> at the end, it just became more and more apparent that he was disconnecting, and i didn't understand, but i just took a different seat and just went with it. >> now do you understand? >> now i do. i had no idea it could be something this serious. >> reporter: the night before he shocked everyone by shooting himself, seau s
football player who committed suicide, and the family asked the nih to look at his brain, and he had ing grain from the autopsy. it is more than a problem. it is really horrible. >> colby, the coach to be held accountable? >> it stops with him. sure, you can put to him and say he should take in and out -- taking him out of the game. now you have to concentrate on the rickety quarterback and get him ready for next year and get rg3 time to rehabilitate himself. we can spend a lot of time on this could the nature of the sport is injury. i came out of the game in high school and had any injury, and my son had the same kind of injury and had surgery. is not baseball, it is not tennis. is a contact sport. >> evan? >> what makes this art is that he is not just another athlete, he is a great guy. he is intelligent, well spoken. added to the pecos. -- added to the peso's. the fact is that it is a rough game and people get hurt. >> football, somebody once said, is not a contact sport. square dancing is a contact sport. it is a collision sport. it is the nature of the game, and the nfl is going to
health.gov and get the best medical information available anywhere. nih seniorhealth.gov. built with you in mind. of the united states of america... and to the republic for which it stands... one nation, under god... indivisible, with liberty... and justice for all. our disabled veterans pledged to sacrifice life and limb to ensure our way of life. now, they deserve our support. find out how you can help disabled veterans in your community. visit dav.org. um] ♪[tum] ♪[tum] ♪[tum] ♪[tum] ♪[tum] [phone ring,] car brakes hard [phone ring] [car crash] glass shatters [sirens] this video was submitted by a student through the safety scholars program. for more information on teen safety visit driversedge.org. >> here's how teens answered our question for the week. >> global warming -- we hear about it all the time. but do any of us do anything about it? >> yes, i try. i like -- i walk to school, and then i also shut the sink off and i take tubs so i don't waste water. so, i fill it up, and then i don't fill it up again. >> well i try to, like, recycle, and i tell, 'cause every day in school w
sequencing center was one of five major labs to take part in the nih sponsored human genome project where scientists worked for more than 10 years to identify those three billion bases of human dna. today, dr. gibbs and a team of researchers are using state-of-the-art machines such as the solid 3 sequencing system to sequence the same amount of dna in just a matter of weeks. >> this is an actual dna sequencing machine. it's very different to the sequencing machines that we used to sequence the human genome. those older man machines could do 100 samples in three hours. this machine does 200 million samples in two weeks. it's dramatically different. the machine is loaded with individual tiny beads that are each loaded with an individual dna molecule that is amplified and coded around the bead and all intersect together and there are chemical reactions performed on the surface. >> the science is making its way into medical and pediatric care. there are more than a thousand dna based gene tests available to infants and adults. newborn genetic screening can identify disorders present in a chil
on at nih over the course of the bush, the second bush administration, that i think in the end created some of this problem. nih is an organization, please were scientists and biologists go get funding. the wait is typically done was about 25,000 proposals a year would come in, and it was a huge marketplace of ideas. 25,000 people would write their best ideas down, then they would be renewed by panels of a scientist who would place them in some priority order and find something like 15-20% of it, something like that. the bush administration didn't cut the funding any particular way but they changed the way it operated. they came up with this thing called a road map. that was a disaster. this roadmap was how will we make scientist serve a purpose, not just idle curiosity driven stuff like that. and so they had a roadmap. suddenly if you were smart and jeanette operate this roadmap, like he wanted to do age research, you could get five grams. you didn't need five but you could get five. if you wanted to basic virus research you could get one anyway. so this roadmap turned nih from a bottom-up
to not have a dad. >> in a statement we just received, the seau family says, "while the nih's findings have provided a measure of comfort, we remain heartbroken that junior is no longer with us and are deeply saddened to receive confirmation that he suffered from such a debilitating condition. junior was a loving father, teammate, and committed member of his community. that is how we will always remember him." "outfront" tonight, coy wilder. you have suffered multiple concussions, and several times you were seeing stars and went back out on the field. what was your reaction today when you heard that junior seau suffered from cte, which he got from football? >> i think a lot of former players were expecting that, erin. it's sad. and i think the main thing is that we can't allow junior seau, dave duerson, even high school athletes like jaquan waller, who have died because of head injury, we can't allow them to die in vain. we have to take what we have learned from them and continue to evolve with safety issues and equipment evolution as well. >> coy, we see from the nfl ads talking about how
available anywhere. nih seniorhealth.gov. built with you in mind. >> grab a pen. aubrey has another great recipe from the culinary institute of america. >> remember earlier how we mentioned we were going to be making a toad in a frog? that's because we're going to be using an avocado instead of a piece of bread. we're going to take an avocado, and we're going to be using a knife. be careful. be gentle. just place the knife in the avocado, and we'll roll along the seed until you get to the other side. remove the knife, place the avocado in your hands, twist a little bit, and then open it up. now we're going to be removing the seed from the avocado. if you've never done this before, don't be afraid. you can ask someone to help you. it's very easy, and i'll show you exactly how you can do it in a very safe way. the way i do it, i like to have a towel to put the avocado on so i have a little bit of stability for the avocado. place the part with the seed onto the towel and gently place the knife over the seed and then give it a little bit of a whack. now take the seed with the avocado and the
to nihseniorhealth.gov and get the best medical information available anywhere. nih seniorhealth.gov. built with you in mind. >> there's no end to the amazing ways to spend time online. just click this. >> in comic books, superheroes battle evil to save the world, and if you've ever wanted to help, here's your chance, thanks to marvel.com. once you get to the home page, scroll down to "extras." click on "create your own comic." the site gives you all the things you need. first, decide what page layout you want. then choose your superheroes and villains. you can create sound effects, add backgrounds, and even write dialogue. when you've finished creating your comic, you can print it or e-mail it to friends. for comic book fans, i can sum up this site in one word -- marvel-ous! with "click this," i'm harry. >> there are lots of villains you love to hate, but there's only one villain you love to love, and as nicole reports, he wants your help. >> at universal orlando resort, one of the newest attractions is "despicable me minion mayhem," based on the popular animated movie. so, on this ride, w
the best medical information available anywhere. nih seniorhealth.gov. built with you in mind. of the united states of america... and to the republic for which it stands... one nation, under god... indivisible, with liberty... and justice for all. our disabled veterans pledged to sacrifice life and limb to ensure our way of life. now, they deserve our support. find out how you can help disabled veterans in your community. visit dav.org. thanks for calling the ged pep talk center. jerry stier speaking. your level 7 "in your face" pep talk. once you've got your ged diploma, you'll feel so good about yourself. you tell 'em! mr. trejo, can i transfer this guy to you? he needs something a little more... persuasive? [telephones ringing] yes! announcer: whatever motivation you need, we've got a pep talk for you at yourged.org. >> the song "be our guest" in disney's "beauty and the beast" gives us a glimpse of what is called "hospitality management." that's the business of running places like restaurants and hotels. in this week's "college and u," nicole reports on a school that is ve
: ron andrews of life technologies, do you work with the nih and you take grants from them? how did they do technology? >> guest: we are one of the largest supporters of the nih and they use our technology. it's used all over the am i h. system. frances collins who is the head of the nih is very fond of -- he is up there talking about how health care is going to be changed so if we have a great relationship with the nih and they grant money out to researchers and of course we apply those researchers to technology so they can do advanced research. >> host: ron andrews is the president of medical sciences provided technology. we are here at ces international in las vegas. thank you for your time. >> guest: thank you, peter. >> host: are programming from ces international show 2013 in las vegas continues next week. this is "the communicators" on c-span. two members of congress are joining us on "washington journal". next a discussion on stabilizing health care costs and improving health outcomes. we will hear from health care practitioners and insurers. this one hour and 40 minute even
would find that the road has been narrowed. there is a portion between the beltway and nih that is pretty much only the left lane getting through and then one lane and then back down to two lanes getting closer to the studio. shoulder to shoulder, we've been cleared. notice this ramp here. this is very much a slick ramp. this is where we typically find a lot of accidents. i don't have any for you right now. and also the parking lots have not been treated so allow a little extra time and be careful once you make your destination and head over towards the door. that's a check of your fox 5 on-time traffic. >> thank you. >>> you just heard it from tucker. winter weather is making an appearance in our area this morning. >> the district says its snow team is ready and already out on the roads dealing with whatever is out there. fox 5's melanie alnwick is live in northwest d.c. in the elements as you can clearly see there. >> we can barely see you through the snowflakes. >> part of the reason you are able to see all this snow is because my photographer dave rysak has shown a ligh
the studies at n.i.h. that these two things together make you a real candidate for this disease. this book has the best information on the planet for people who have this or people who don't or people who think they might and know somebody. >> when do you know you're an addict? some people call them social drinkers, heavy drinkers. when do you reach the point where you say i can't control this without doing so? >> it's a cost benefit thing. how much harm is this behavior causing you in your life and do you want to change it? you're the only one who can make the diagnosis? it depends on how much harm, if there's enough harm and you're willing to make the changes, you can pick up this book and get the information that you need. >> your family, yourself, your brothers. you lost a brother david down in florida to an overdose. >> my cousin david. >> your uz canins michael. who knows what influence it had? your mom had the problem. some of it's your family. some of it's just you. >> but i had the honor of responseoring the mental health parity and addiction act with my father. and for me it was a gr
, as dr. sigell said, the nih, national institutes of health, center for disease control, all of these folks have been a very good job of plotting the course of this flu which comes from south america appear. and they have to make these decisions. how far in advance? a full year? >> they do it in the summer before down in south america and asia and like it will happen here in our winter. it's about 60 percent effective on a good year, and that is what we are expecting this year. that's why we need to create a ring of community. we have to vaccinate young people so that everyone in the household is protected. the more people i vaccinate in a given house to less young children are at risk, less people with chronic illness. if she has an elderly parent or grandparent, vaccinator. less likely flew enters the house to begin with. lou: and the ages from six months, is this correct, from six months and on up. is that correct? >> you can give it to someone six months and up. before that there not pointing it immune. well, the youngest and things will get it from breast -- from being i
at the policy level. >> i think the nih and the cbc would make sense. -- the cdc would make sense. industry reach search, stand- alone, people would say that that's tainted. i think there is good stuff out there that can help parents and policymakers. >> you were at the meeting. how did they react? >> industry people were glad that there were not automatically being targeted. even if there were a link, as the vice-president said come it would be such a tiny amount compared to the other factors he looked at that week. some people were saying, if i am a parent, i think the games i make as a developer are good games. if there were things i could do to reduce harm, i would want to do that. what we do is art. it is an entertainment art form. this is not about behavior change. >> our first call is from farmington, maine, republican line. >> it is great to be with you guys. the media has a huge impact. i watched the thing on c-span having to do with moving east -- with movies. >> we will leave this conversation. you can find it online. taking to the day of service tent on the national mall here in
committed suicide in may. now we may know why. seau's brain was studied at nih. doctors found cte, the same type of brain damage founded in other forms of deceased players and boxers, typically caused by repeated head trauma. people who have it display symptoms like dementia, memory loss, and depression. more than 30 nfl players have been found to have deceased nfl players found to have that same disease. >>> caps training camp scheduled to start on sunday, but players and fans alike have been getting reacclimated to the practice facility already. that's where guys like brooks got an early start and shared some of their thoughts about the lockout. from lockout to plaqueout. a serene setting as unofficial practice started in the dark. >> still locked out, apparently. >> reporter: lighting the lamp not as much of a concern. >> ovechkin. >> reporter: as bringing back the casual fan bridge et, her friend and their kids came from annapolis just to watch practice. >> i want them to be excited about hockey, and i don't want them to be aware of all the stuff that goes on in the background. i just w
. this will impact the commute for those headed southbound headed out from nih. plan the trip accordingly. this will hurt you traveling southbound along 355. man on using connecticut avenue, maybe even using the beltway over to river road headed into d.c. wisconsin avenue down to one right lane getting by southbound as well as northbound. for those traveling along the outer loop of the beltway at new hampshire avenue, we had a stalled vehicle reported along the right side of the roadway. notice the express lanes northbound 95 north of lorton, very slow headed up to the franconia springfield parkway, incident there tying up the shoulder. shoulder. that's a check of your fox 5 on-time traffic. traffic. . >> thank you. >>> the parents of the duchess of cambridge are cashing in on kate's pregnancy. they own a party supply company you may have heard before and are now featuring royal themed baby shower items on their web site. britain's daily mail newspaper is reporting that the middletons are promoting a range of baby goods from their party supplies business. they are described as suitable fo
towards nih and out to the d.c. line. plan your trip early. if you are headed into d.c., you may want to think about using the beltway over to river road as an alternative commute. wisconsin avenue between bradley and willard, only the right leap getting through. we have more problems to report. this is going to be a portion of 16th street near 410, the east-west highway with the vehicle overturned on its side. northbound 16th street headed back up towards the beltway. the right lane remains closed off at the scene of this crash. we'll continue northbound now i- 95, we are in the hov lanes. northbound i-59 well below speed out of stafford leaving aquia harbor headed up towards 234 dumfries. that's a check of your fox 5 on-time traffic. traffic. . >>> checking our top stories now, classes resume this morning for students and teachers of sandy hook elementary school less than three weeks after the deadly shooting there. signs of school colors line the road leading to the new school just down the road from the shooting scene in the town of monroe where classes will be held. last night, p
disease when he killed himself last spring. researchers at nih made that discovery after seau's family asked them to investigate the death. they found the nfl great had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or cti, i can say, common in people with, symptoms including mood swings, irrationality, and depression. his family said he exhibited all those behaviors prior to his suicide. >>> tomorrow the centers for disease control and prevention will come out with their latest flu numbers, and they're expecting some big increase sfloos doreen gentzler joins us with what details about what local doctors are seeings. >> if you haven't gotten your flu shot yet, it is not too late, but don't wait another minute to get one. that's because some clinicings are running low on flew vaccine supplie supplies. >> headaches, sore throat, achy. >> i'm buying hall's and airborne to keep me from getting sick. >> reporter: patients are pouring into the e.r. looking for relief. >> we've had a huge surge. probably up 20%. >> reporter: that might not seen like a huge increase, but the director for the emergency depa
talking about health programs, including nih research. were talking about infrastructure. we're talking that key domestic discretionary programs that are so important for the lives of the vast majority of the american people. so let me just say two things about that. number one, there has to be a balance. and number two, i think it is fido, as the president said so clearly yesterday, that the debt ceiling essentially must not use to say what then that essentially takes on and essentially undoes the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president made so clear what would he have staked if that were to happen and i just think it's so critical that not occur. you know, i've been through these battles as i've said for many decades, but i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff in terms of the full faith and credit of the united states. the consequences with teeth, i think, to not take, potentially cataclysmic. and for the republicans who essentially say, let's do it, i think that would be a very, very serious mistake with foreseeable c
programs, including nih research. we are talking about infrastructure. we are talking about key domestic discretionary programs that are so important for the lives of the vast majority of the american people. as the president subsequently yesterday, the debt ceiling essentially must not be used as a weapon. it essentially takes on an is the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president has made so clear what would be at stake if that were to happen. i just believe that it is so critical that that not occurred. you know, i have been through these battles for many decades. i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff. the consequences would be, i think, shamanic and potentially cataclysmic. for the republicans that say let's do it, i think i would be a mistake with foreseeable consequences. the federal reserve has said the responsible physician is we should not forget. >> the president says he's not going to talk about the debt ceiling, speaker boehner said it can be done unless we cut spending at the same time. what are the odds of av
late wife was involved in, and she ran a peer review group at nih on child mental health and child development. when she started, she did that for 20-25 years. they would have for peer review, a hundred applications. they'd say maybe 50 of them were reviewed by peer review. out of those, they might pick 25 that really should be funded. in those days, not so long ago, there was enough money of the 20-25 topical -- top caliber to fund 15 #. today, it's one, two, or three of the original hundred, and the same is true in medical research in nih. they also don't have adequate funding for our health. are we beginning to further cut funding for nih for funding in the country? the same is true in terms of trending programs. we need to retrain americans so that their -- they're able to really qualify for every kind of job. we have a training deficit in this country. we need to combine training programs and do a better job. are we going to hurt that effort? that's what's at stake here when the republicans say, just cut regardless. they had no reason to remember yesterday to cut all discretio
signaling what should be in the vaccine. the nih is a resort organization. we do research on influenza and understanding pathogenesis and developing drugs against it and helping along with pharmaceutical companies to develop a vaccine. that's what we do in collaboration is init and then try to make countermeasures against it in the form of treatment and prevention. host: how much does all that cost? guest: a lot of money. if you just look at the research, the nih spends every year about $260 million on influence of research. in addition, we are continually trying to make better vaccines, including vaccines that might be good for all strains. the cdc also spends tens if not hundreds of millions of dollars in their tracking and surveillance of influenza throughout the country. so it is a very serious issue which should not be taken lightly. on any given year there is wide variability, but it can go from a few thousand deaths to up to 49,000 deaths in the u.s. each season has 200 hospitalizations and $285 billion in economic cost. this is a serious issue appeared that the reason we both t
. that is a discussion we had discussed a lot at nih, not just in the mental health arena, but across all of the diseases for which we are responsible for providing better science. the response to your question or typical assumption behind it is there is a 17-year gap between discovery and implementation, so what we used to talk a lot about was how you move from research to practice. interestingly, i was set in the last two years, there's been a transformation in terms of how we talk about this -- i would say in the last two years. how do we move from practice to research? how do we make sure we develop health care systems but learning health care systems that are involved in the research care process itself? at nih, we have created several efforts to do that, involving millions of patients through a large health-care system like kaiser and many others, in which we are doing research for doing actual practical trials in these very large groups -- or doing actual practical trials. the advantage is you are making discoveries in the place where they will be implemented, rather than doing it, for instance, i
andrews of med sal sciences for life technologies, do you work with the nih? do you take grants from them, and how do you, how do they view technology in medicine? >> guest: well, we're one of the largest supporters of the nih, clearly, and they use our technology. you know, it's used all over the nih system. francis collins, who is now the head of the nih, is very fond of my chip. i've seen him in front of congress, and he's up there talking about how health care's going to get changed. so we have a great relationship with the nih, and they grant money out to academic centers and to researchers and, of course, we supply those researchers with technology so that they can do this advanced research on diseases. >> host: ron andrews is the president of medical sciences for life technologies. we're here at ces international in las vegas. thank you for your time. >> guest: thank you, peter. of. >> host: our programming from the ces international show 2013 in las vegas continues next week. this is "the communicators" on c-span. >> coming up, a group of journalists discuss the future of conserva
andrews, d work with nih? do you take koretz with them? >> we are one of the -- do you take grants with them? >> friends as collins, the head of nih, -- francis collins, the head of nih, is talking about how health care will change. we have a great relationship with them. they grant money to researchers and misapplied researches and with technology -- and we supply researchers with technology. >> and this is the president of life technologies. thank you for your time. >> thank you. >> our programming on the ces international show continues next week. this is "the communicators" on cspan. >> tomorrow, washington journal focus is on the topic of our nation's governors, their role on the national state and public and policy issues they face. we will hear from josh goodman on the trends and turnarounds and the state's relationship with the other zero government. and as always, your calls and questions on "washington journal," live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the best training you can get to become a good police officer is [indiscernible] you learn how to use intelligence informa
. it was out of nih, and they followed over 250,000 people. it's an association. what that means is out of this large group of people, the people that were drinking regularly the sugary sodas and the diet sodas were more likely to be diagnosed with depression later on. that's an association. it didn't show the chemicals in diet soda or the sugar in regular soda caused it. i think this raises eyebrows. researchers are going to dive in. they need to do more studies. at the end of the day soda is not good for you anyway. it doesn't even matter what the outcomes are. >> i had a friend that lost 30 pounds after giving up diet soda. he drank 20 of them a day. >> some people feel like it intensifies the sweet cravings. when you get rid of the diet soda you don't crave the sweets so much. that's probably what happened. >> let's talk -- >> let's eat while we talk. what are we doing here? >> everybody loves guacamole, but unfortunately it's very good for you, but it's fattening because it's a lot of good fat. a half a cup is 170 calories. hoda, i want you to dump this into here, the gawk mow la.
-related accidents, or shootings or whatever. but there were only three research grants from nih to look at why these things are happening. that information vacuum has to be stopped. and that is enormous. >> i wish you were right. i wish you were right. >> that's right. >> i know on the health research, you can do a lot. but he does not have the power to figure out who owns these thee hundred million guns in the country when they change hands, hen they change property. nobody knows where these things are. >> so you're still saying it's the usual little things. >> and the bureau that is supposed to keep track of this, the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms, atf, has been paralyzed for the last few years. doesn't have a leader. republicans have been blocking. >> right now we're not collecting any data. we're flushing all of it. and what a lot of these executive orders say is that we now are pushing people to share that information to collect it, share it. >> margaret, what do you think? is this small bore stuff or the big things you think he is going to make any headway on. >> i agree with d
or whatever. there are only three research grants from nih to look at why these things are happening. >> that information vacuum has to be stopped. this is enormous. >> i wish you were right. >> that's right. >> i no he know on health resea you can do a lot. he does not have power to figure out who owns 3 million guns in the country. nobody knows where these things are. the bureau that's supposed to keep track of this, the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms, atf, has been paralyzed for the last few years, doesn't have a leader. ren ca republicans have been blocked. >> we are collecting data. a lot of these executive orders say that we now are pushing people to share that information, to collect it, share it. >> what do you think? is this small bore stuff or the big things, do you think he will be able to make any headway? >> i agree with david he has certainly gone long. he is throwing the long ball. he has put big plans down on the table. i think in order to pass anything through congress, you have to strategically win over the reasonable edge of the opposition in both the sena
're funding a lot of research. they just donated $30 million to is the nih foundation. they've led some of the fights for state laws that require education on concussions, and you have to see a doctor. but we need to do a lot more because we don't even have our arms wrapped around this problem at all. >> chris nowinski, great to have you on "the ed show" tonight. thank you. that's "the ed show." i'm ed schultz. "the rachel maddow show" starts right now. good evening, rachel. >> you have a big football watching weekend ahead of you? >> i'm all for the packers. once we get through the texans we'll see you there. >> thanks to you at home for staying with us this fine friday night. on the night of august 31st, 2010 which was a tuesday night, if you were planning to watch tv you were planning to watch a show called ncis at 8:00 p.m. that night. if you were not planning on watching ncis that night the thing you most likely next to be watching was a show called wipe out. those shows on cbs was scheduled for 8:00 p.m. that tuesday night. that shows did not air as planned at 8:00 because at 8:00
. and we know from the studies at nih that these two things together make you a real candidate for this disease. this book has the best information on the planet today for people who have this illness and people who don't or people who think they might or know somebody. >> when do you know you're an addict? some people call themselves social drinkers, heavy drinkers. >> it's a cost benefit thing. it's how much harm is this behavior causing you in your life? and do you want to change it. if you're the only one that can really make that diagnosis. and it depends on how much harm, if there's enough harm and you're willing to make some changes, you can pick up this book and you can get the information that you need. >> your family, patrick, yourself, your brothers, you lost a brother david, down in florida -- >> my cousin, david. >> your cousins like michael. your mom had the problem. some of it's your family, some of it is just you. >> you know what, i had the honor of sponsoring the mental health act with my father. and, for me, it was a great, personal vindication that i got to
, thank you. thank you, lars. >>> we're going to switch gears for a second. the nih is concerned today that nfl star junior sayou did indeed suffer from the same kind of brain disease that afflicts many pro football players with many concussions. this comes as the league continues to fight a pricey lawsuit filed by a group of retired players. >>> and also tonight, the stunningly great movie "lincoln takes 12 oscar nominations today. this is my absolute favorite movie. it is a film about washington dysfunction then and now. and it is a film about how abe lincoln solved an incredible problem, 150 years ago to free the slaves. they didn't want to do it. lincoln showed him how to do it and maybe we can all learn something from this fabulous movie. we'll have much more on this later in the show. >> this settles the fate for all coming time. not only of the millions now in bondage, but of unborn millions to come. so if you have a flat tire, dead battery, need a tow or lock your keys in the car, geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah,
doesn't make sense. and the cut cans across the board to nondefense spending like nih and air traffic control and all of that, that doesn't make sense. now all of the sudden within the republican caucus, the tea party wing has gotten them to reverse their position. now the cuts they said were reckless, no problem, we're going to make that happen, even though the congressional budget office has said that will hurt our economy. so on top of keeping this debt ceiling cloud over the economy, they're talking about these across-the-board meat ax cuts that will also hurt the economy, when we should be focused on jobs and economic growth. >> congressman chris van hollen, good to have you with us tonight on "the ed show." >> good to be with you. thank you. >> there is a lot more coming up in the next half hour of "the ed show." stay with us. ted nugent goes off the deep end. >> the barack obama gang attempting to reimplement the tyranny of king george. >> we'll show you what he and his buddies will be up against. >>> we all pay a transaction tax every day, but not the fat cats on wall street.
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